A Review On Midnight Train To Prague By Carol Windley

Midnight Train to Prague shows the journey of Natalia Faber through World War II and the struggles of experiencing the war and the aftermath of the war.

Throughout Midnight Train to Prague, we are shown Natalia’s life story where she grew up, got married, and then when World War II started, got thrown into the center 

Book: Midnight Train to Prague by Carol Windley
Series: Standalone
Publication Date: April 14, 2020
(Thank you NetGalley for this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review)
**While this book has already been out I did receive it early so thank you again NetGalley!**
Tags: Historical Fiction, World War II, Romance
Links: Goodreads | Ebook | Paperback | Hardback | Audio
Read: August 5, 2020 to August 8, 2020


An unforgettable tale of what we owe to those we love, and those we have left behind

In 1927, as Natalia Faber travels from Berlin to Prague with her mother, their train is delayed in Saxon Switzerland. In the brief time the train is idle, Natalia learns the truth about her father and meets a remarkable woman named Dr. Magdalena Schaefferová, whose family will become a significant part of her future.

Shaken by these events, Natalia arrives at a spa on the shore of Lake Hevíz in Hungary. Here, she meets the journalist and writer Miklós Count Andorján. In time, they will marry, and Natalia will devote herself to life on a rural estate in Hungary.

When war breaks out in Europe, Natalia loses contact with Miklós. She believes they are to meet in Prague, a city under Nazi occupation. She sets up shop as a fortune teller with a pack of Tarot cards. In this guise, she meets Magdalena Schaefferová’s young daughter, Anna. Accused by the Nazis of spying, Natalia is sent to a concentration camp. In April 1945, Natalia and Anna are reunited, and with courage and determination, find the strength to begin again in a changed world.


Rating: 2 out of 5.

Midnight Train to Prague shows the journey of Natalia Faber through World War II and the struggles of experiencing the war and the aftermath of the war.

Throughout Midnight Train to Prague, we are shown Natalia’s life story where she grew up, got married, and then when World War II started, got thrown into the center of it. Her mother, Beatriz, raised Natalia alone and had brought her up to become a really strong character which I really liked throughout the book and it was great to see that while both Beatriz and Natalia had a lot to go through in the beginning and in the story, they both stepped up and fought for what they cared about.

I gave Midnight Train to Prague two stars finding that while the story was definitely a good topic to read about, but it didn’t intrigue me. I am a huge fan of historical fiction so I requested to read this out of my love for history but when I started to dive into this book, I felt okay about it. The story was good to read about and the writing style was interesting but there were some parts that were unnecessary for the story and when reading I found that there was too much going on. There were too many character point of views and while reading it, there was no distinction as to who’s point of view we were reading from.

I found that this book was just difficult to process and the way the writing styles seemed to not fit the book made it worse. And the way to book was formatted (the ARC that I received), there was a lack of quotations and the omissions of some things were quite irritating. I also found that Anna’s story was unnecessary and just, in my opinion, disappointing when the book ended with her thoughts.

The story itself could have had so much more potential if there were things that I wish I would have liked more.

Thank you again to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

I hope you guys have a great day, please like and comment down below if you enjoyed this book as well or if you plan on reading it!

Loves,

Veronica Chen

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